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Traditional Academics

Please note:

NOT all classes offered every year

- Courses are year-long unless indicated as one semester only. Students who do not take the second semester of a year-long course, will earn a W/Grade on the transcript for the fall semester.

- All students enrolled in an AP course(s) are required to take the AP exam for that course(s).

- "U" Indicates courses for which college credit may be earned.

- Students are responsible for fees for all AP Tests ( $90/test) and for UMPI credits ($15/credit hour)

** = NOT a core academic class


NOT all classes offered every year

  • Computer Science

CIS 211 - Web Development:

This course will introduce students to the basic languages, protocols, and tools used in web development. Although some time will be spent learning higher level tools such as site builders and content management systems, much of the course will focus on the fundamental underlying technologies such as HTTP, HTML, JavaScript, JSON, and CSS. (Fall Semester)

  • Computer Science

CIS 212 - Introduction to Programming and Algorithms:

Introduction to Programming and Algorithms will cover fundamental coding concepts using the C++ language.  Variables and types, control flow, procedural programming techniques, elementary data structures, and some basic object oriented programming concepts will be discussed and implemented.  An introduction to digital logic, Boolean algebra, binary and hexadecimal number systems, memory organization, and other elements of computer organization and architecture will be studied to provide a foundation and context for understanding the operation of computers.  Students will participate in hands-on programming projects, involving problem decomposition, analysis and design, and standard software engineering principles and practices.   Prerequisite:  None (Semester) Class will be offered again in the spring semester

  • Computer Science
  • Fine Arts

CIS 213 - 3D Rendering and Animation:

This course will introduce the students to Blender, a 3D modeling, rendering, and animation tool. The students will learn to create both still images as well as animations of objects and scenes that they create using the tools provided by Blender. Examples of topics to be covered include: Introduction to the Blender UI, creating and modifying 3D objects, applying color, shading, and materials, lighting, the use of cameras, rendering, fundamentals of animation, scripting with Python. This course fulfills the fine arts graduation requirement. (Fall Semester)

  • Computer Science

CIS 214 - Creative Robotics:

This course will combine technology and creativity. Students will learn how to program the Arduino microcontroller and how to interface with electronic sensors and actuators. Using these skills along with the tools and materials of MSSM’s Makerspace, the students will design and implement one or more projects ranging from the practical to the whimsical. (Fall Semester)

  • Computer Science

CIS 310 - Data Structures and Algorithms: 

Applied Algorithms and Data Structures will continue to develop and expand the programming concepts covered by Introduction to Programming and Algorithms.  Students will be introduced to standard data structures and algorithms using the C++ programming language.   Students will write code to implement these structures and algorithms, as well as to use them in the context of larger programs.   More advanced software development tools and software engineering principles will be will be introduced and explored.  Prerequisites:  Intro to Programming or prior C++ experience.(Fall Semester)

  • Computer Science

CIS 311 - App Development:

This course will introduce students to the tools, languages, and techniques used in the creation of basic applications for Android-based mobile devices. Programming will be done using Java and Android Studio. Topics will include: Introduction to Java, user input, interface design, sensor integration, data storage, XML and JSON, and more. Prerequisite: Data Structures & Algorithms (Spring Semester)

  • Computer Science

CIS 312 - Game Development:

Students will learn game development using the Unity game engine and the C# programming language.  This project-based course will use a series of increasingly complex programming exercises to introduce various game development concepts as well as specific features of C# and Unity. Prerequisite: Data Structures and Algorithms
(Spring Semester)

  • Computer Science

CIS 410 - Topics in Software Engineering and Robotics:

This course will allow the student to explore more advanced topics in software engineering and/or robotics. Possible software engineering topic areas include game development, robot control, image processing, application development, library development, and so on. Robotics topics could include design and development of robots or other electronic or electromechanical devices, or participation in external or in-house robotics competitions. The course will be project-based, and the specific topics will be agreed upon between the instructor and student(s).

Both individual or group projects may be considered. Students must be self-motivated and will be expected to do considerable independent work both in and out of the classroom. Prerequisite: Introduction to Programming and either Creative Robotics or Data Structures (or by instructor permission) (Spring Semester)

  • English

ENG 210 - Composition:

Composition and Research is an [introductory] English course in which students study basic rhetoric and practice strategies for effective writing, listening, speaking, and researching for college and professional life. Prerequisite: Placement by Department

  • English

ENG 211 - Honors Composition & Research:

Honors Composition is an accelerated course in which students study rhetoric and master strategies for effective writing, analysis, listening, speaking, and researching for college and professional life. Prerequisite: Placement by Department

  • English

ENG 222 Literary Studies – Tolkien and the Past, Present, and Future of Fantasy:

The Lord of the Rings is a special topic course in Literary Studies that is designed to be interdisciplinary and multimedia in approach. The course extends students’ skills in rhetorical and literary analysis, examining the ways stories change and are made into media (and mediums). Students will read J. R. R. Tolkien’s original texts—The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion as well as Tolkien’s shorter fiction and the works that inspired it (such as selections from Hope Mirrless). One to two days a month, students will work their way through The Lord of the Rings storyline, discussing how the massive, multiplayer online universe appropriates J. R. R. Tolkien’s original texts, studying Tolkien characterization and mythos. This course will include anonymous curated streaming experiences that will allow the class to build a community both in the classroom and in a broader educational community online.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition Course and/or recommendation of the department

  • English

ENG 223 Literary Studies - The Religious Genome in Western Literature:

Like the Western world's culture and history, its literature--especially English literature--has been heavily influenced by Judaeo-Christian traditions and texts; this influence has been so profound that no scholar can grasp the bulk of Western texts without being familiar with the bible; the key rituals, traditions, and philosophies of Christian theology; and important, defining moments in church history. These materials have been used as touchstones and sources by writers of the classics, and by writers of check-out line Westerns and pulse-racing Romances. From poetry to fiction to the stage, the aphorisms and imagery of heaven and hell abound. In Literary Studies: The Religious Genome in Western Literature, students will become familiar with these ancient traditions as they read a variety of literature, both centuries old to recently published, in verse, in narrative, and even on the silver screen. During each unit, students will read assigned texts; take notes and research class projects through which they will apply the principles; and through all of this, compile the understanding and material for a final unit assignment (an essay or presentation). The final unit assignment will require them to engage the text or texts through rhetorical, critical, and/or literary analysis.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition Course and/or recommendation of the department

  • English

ENG 310 - Composition and Literature:

How do we use literature to tell the true stories of our lives, our culture, our history, and our memories? In this class we’ll look at how literature represents real events, social change and the way we remember and tell our stories by first reading new and classic true-crime nonfiction and then using what we’ve found to expand our exploration into fiction, poetry, film, and more. We will also work towards producing strong, clear, thorough writing about literature and social criticism. Sample Texts: Columbine (Cullen), In Cold Blood (Capote), Serial (radio series). Prerequisite: Successful completion of an MSSM composition course and placement by Department.

  • English

ENG - Comparative Literature:

(Spring Semester)

  • English

ENG 311U - APⓇ English Language & Composition:

AP Composition is an accelerated course in which students study rhetoric and master strategies for effective writing, analysis, listening, speaking, and researching for college and professional life. This course will specifically prepare students for the AP English Language Exam.  Prerequisite: Placement or recommendation by Department

  • English

ENG 313 Creative Writing—Learning through Analysis and Mimesis:

Creative Writing takes a dual hands-on approach to the techniques and theories of literature. Throughout the year, students will read a number of history’s iconic creative texts from a variety of forms and genres—in fiction, in poetry, in creative nonfiction, and in drama. While reading these works, students will begin to perform literary analysis, dissecting the texts to understand how they function from not only a reader’s perspective, but also a writer’s perspective. In the first half of each unit, students will work on a short project that compiles the findings of their analyses. In the second half of each unit, students will write, draft and revise their own creative works, writings they will build by applying the same techniques and principles they uncovered while analyzing the key historical texts.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition Course and a Literary Studies course/or recommendation of the department

  • English

ENG 322 - The Quest in Literature:

This course begins pushing students to consider their studies in literature to be a way of exploring the question: “what does it mean to be a human being?” As part of this course, students will be introduced to foundational texts traditionally found in the western canon, including glimpses into the works of European folklore and fairytales, as well as writings by Italo Calvino, Neil Gaiman, Susanna Clarke, and works intentionally chosen to subvert this canon. In this full-year course, students trace the journey of others throughout the literary history of humanity. Simultaneously, they explore their own quests, developing, through weekly journals, major essays, lively class discussion, and oral presentations, a better idea of both literary analysis and their own goals and objectives. Major works include selections from journeys as diverse as those in Gilgamesh (~4500 BCE) and The Odyssey (~700 BCE) to more contemporary writings like Through the Looking-Glass (1871) , Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream (~1590) and Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean at the End of the Lane (2013). Prerequisite: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition Course and a Literary Studies course/or recommendation of the department

  • English
  • English

ENG 422U - Early British Literature:

Early British Literature introduces students, in a general sense, to the literary, linguistic and socio-cultural history of England from Celtic and Anglo-Saxon works through Middle English. Students study these periods through the lens of three great works of literature: Beowulf, Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte D’arthur, and Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. These readings are the focus of the course, although they are supplemented by a substantial number of shorter readings from each period. Assessment is based on major assignments, including analytical, research, and creative writing, as well as quizzes, regular homework, and oral presentation. Active classroom participation will also play a major factor in the assessment of this course. Prerequisites: Placement by the department. Co-requisites: Students must participate in the MSSM Medieval Feast. (Fall Semester)

  • English

ENG 424 Victoria’s Literature:

Over the course of the year, we will study the Victorian period chronologically, beginning with Jane Austen’s most famous coming-of-age novel, Pride and Prejudice, and moving towards the darker, more tormented works of the Brontȅ sisters, including Charlotte Brontȅ's Jane Eyre and the poetry of Anne Brontȅ. The second half of the year will focus on the mid-to-late-Victorian Imagination: the creative and zany world of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; the foppish, privileged society of “The Importance of Being Earnest” by Oscar Wilde; and the moral and mystic dreams found in A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. In addition to the literature itself, students will read a rich selection of primary source documents, including the diaries and letters of Queen Victoria as well as newspapers and periodicals written and read by her citizens. Lastly, students will be provided with full copies of The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine (1842-1879) as part of their study of Victorian print culture. Regular written assessments—in-class essays, portfolios, and reflective journals—will make up the primary written requirements for this course. In addition to writing, students will be assigned to lead class discussion on multiple occasions using our course blog and Socratic seminars. As a final assessment, students will write (and illustrate) their own children’s book or one-act satiric play as a major creative writing project.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition Course, a Literary Studies Course, and a 300-level Literature course, and/or recommendation of the department

  • English

ENG 428U - Utopian Literature:

Can we ever have a perfect world? In Utopian Literature, students will examine the eternal dream-quest of humanity: the search for perfect world. During the semester, students will examine works of literature that explore various authors' interpretation of this question while simultaneously developing their own ideas on what a utopia might look like and how it could, perhaps, be achieved. This class will include independent reading, literary analysis, ethical thought experiments, oral presentation, and guest speakers. During the semester, we will focus on Utopia by Sir Thomas More, The Sword in the Stone by T.H. White, Lost Horizon by James Hilton, Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, and Ursula Le Guin's The Lathe of Heaven, in addition to an assortment of works as selected and presented by the students (possibilities range from The Divine Comedy and The Republic to 1984 and Animal Farm). Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM composition course and another MSSM literature course or permission of the department. (Spring Semester)

  • English

ENG 520 Senior Tutorial in Literature:

Exceptional rising Seniors at MSSM may apply to the department to have a Senior Tutorial based on a combination of the traditional tutorial program of study at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, as well as the developments made by professors and students at Williams College, and adaptations for MSSM. Senior Tutorials are designed to take the most committed and talented MSSM English students and give them an opportunity to be pushed in specific areas of interest, in courses of which they themselves have input in the design. These courses will be intensive combinations of tutorial and seminar meetings. Students should have a significant amount of autonomy and independence in terms of work and should produce, over the course of the year, no fewer than 15,000 words of writing, not including drafts. This course and its prerequisites will allow MSSM’s English faculty to be flexible in terms of who teaches the course and what is offered, tailoring our highest level class to the students who most want it and are most appropriate for it, while also allowing MSSM faculty to have the opportunity to teach at this level. Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition Course, a Literary Studies Course, and a 400-level Literature course, and/or recommendation of the department

  • English

ENG 522 - Storytelling and the Art of Growing Up:

This year-long tutorial-style directed study is among the most advanced English offerings at MSSM. Over the course of the year, students will explore the history of storytelling in all of its modes while simultaneously examining how human beings have dealt with the concept of what we call "growing up." Through weekly analytical and creative writing exercises, we will explore works as diverse as the Ancient Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh and the 20th century Mrs. Dalloway, plays like Wit and The History Boys to children's picture books. As the course unfolds, students will develop their own significant creative writing project that will demonstrate the breadth and depth of both their knowledge and skill. Prerequisites: Successful completion of an MSSM Composition course and two years of MSSM literature courses, as well as the permission of the instructor.

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 161 - MSSM Chorus:

Students participate in rehearsals and performances of choral music appropriate for students with limited background and training. Additional one-on-one and/or small group time will be scheduled with each student. No audition is required – chorus is open to all students.(Fall Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 171 - Small Instrumental Ensemble:

Small ensembles are created within the class in order to utilize the talents of each student on his/her respective instrument in a variety of genres. In addition to expanding each student’s repertoire, the class covers: working in small groups, music history pertaining to the music being performed and basic conducting skills, if interested. This class gives students the chance to lead a small ensemble and to have their own compositions performed at the teacher's discretion. Previous knowledge of instrument required. Additional one-on-one and/or small group time will be scheduled with each student.(Fall Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 172 - Small Instrumental Ensemble:

Small ensembles are created within the class in order to utilize the talents of each student on his/her respective instrument in a variety of genres. In addition to expanding each student’s repertoire, the class covers: working in small groups, music history pertaining to the music being performed and basic conducting skills, if interested. This class gives students the chance to lead a small ensemble and to have their own compositions performed at the teacher's discretion. Previous knowledge of instrument required.  Additional one-on-one and/or small group time will be scheduled with each student.(Spring Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 181 - String Ensemble:

Strings performance group. Additional one-on-one and/or small group time will be scheduled with each student.(Fall Semester)

  • Fine Arts

 
**FAR 182 - String Ensemble:  

Strings performance group.  Additional one-on-one and/or small group time will be scheduled with each student.(Spring Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 201 Art History I:

An academic course in the History of the Art of the Prehistoric, Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Medieval periods.  This will give you a background in Western visual literacy.  Although Art History II continues this course, each may be taken in reverse order or exclusively.  (Fall Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 202 - Art History II:  

A course in the History of Art starting with the Italian Renaissance to Modern Art.  This will help build your visual literacy and prepare you for Western Civilization in the future.  This can be taken for Art or History credit.
Prerequisite:  None(Spring Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 220U - Basic Design:

A hands-on course in design using the Fundamentals and Principles of design from point to two dimensional work and finishing with three dimensional work in various mediums.(Spring Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 223 - Landscape Watercolor:

A course in painting the landscape in watercolor.  The class will often meet outdoors and paint "en plein air".  We will do the landscape through the seasons.  Obviously, winter will be done inside at windows.  We will learn the techniques that work best for landscape painting.  Prerequisite:  None  (Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 224U - Drawing:

A course in the fundamentals of watercolor technique.  This course will be taught individually so the beginners and advanced students can grow from the experience.  Grades are based on improvement and talent is not necessary to do well. (Fall Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 321 - Watercolor Workshop:

A course in the fundamentals of watercolor technique. This course will be taught individually so the beginners and advanced students can grow from the experience. Grades are based on improvement and talent is not necessary to do well.(Spring Semester)

  • Fine Arts

**FAR 341 -Yearbook:

High school yearbooks and the MSSM Yearbook in particular, are historical records representing the specific year in pictures and words through a thematic, yet accurate approach. In the course, students are introduced to concepts of classic as well as nouveau approaches to layout and design. All of the considerations for a publication are examined including sales, photography, headlines and captions, proofing, digital layout, design, publishing and consideration of the full MSSM audience.

  • Fitness

**Cycling:

Go ride the roads with Mr. Tasker, and get some healthy exercise along the way.  Students need to have a bicycle and a bike helmet in order to participate.  (Semester)

  • Fitness

**Dance Fitness:  

The ultimate goal of this class is to get moving and have fun while learning a variety of dances. The majority of the dances we will learn will be partner dances such as ballroom, medieval, and contra dance. Each session will begin with warming up and stretching, followed by some background information on the dance we will be learning that day. All ability levels are welcome, dancing can be as easy as walking! (Semester)

  • Fitness

**PHY - Aquatic Fitness:  

This class will offer students an alternative and unique physical education experience in the LCS/MSSM pool.  We will cover basic swimming and endurance, water games, and water fitness.  Must have a one-piece bathing suit and basic swimming skills.  (Semester)

  • Fitness

**PHY 100 - Boffer:

In Boffer students construct and fight with various weapons made of PVC piping and safely coated in foam.  In each class, participants do a warm-up of stretching and running prior to engaging in combat, strategy sessions and team challenges. Boffer offers a high level of fun and exercise while teaching the skills and techniques of medieval fighting, as well as team-work and strategy. Long-term participation allows students to enter into leadership positions in which they will be asked to design games, instruct younger students and lead teams. Students are required to provide their own equipment at a cost of between $4.00 and $20.00 depending on the extent of personalization.  (Semester)

  • Fitness

**PHY 102 - Traditional Fitness:

Students who opt to take a traditional fitness class will attend two one hour sessions per week that are led by an instructor from the Residential Life staff. These sessions will provide each student with the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program consisting of skill development, lead up games, team sports, individual sports, and physical fitness activities indoors and outdoors. The students will also receive instruction in rules, skills, and strategies associated with the different sports as well as learning experiences involving physical conditioning activities and lifelong physical activities. Traditional Fitness classes promote the spirit of cooperation, leadership, fair play and friendly competition. (Semester)

  • Fitness

**PHY 111 - Independent Fitness:  

Students who opt to pursue an independent fitness class are required to engage in some form of sustained and measurable physical activity (e.g. jogging, strength training, hiking, skiing etc.) for a minimum of two hours a week. Exercise times must be logged and will be tracked by the Residential Life Staff. Students who opt to take an independent fitness class may be moved to a structured fitness class at the discretion of the Academic Dean and/or Dean of Students if they repeatedly fail to meet the minimum requirement of two hours of exercise per week. NOT available for incoming first year students. (Semester)

  • Fitness

**Weight Training and Conditioning:

Learn to pump iron with Maine’s strongest man. This course is designed to educate students in key areas of health and fitness. Main areas of focus include muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, power, flexibility and balance. Students will learn weightlifting techniques and will be able to design a weight­ training and conditioning program that is realistic and attainable for their specific goals. This course does require a high level of physical activity, and dressing for class is required. This course requires written work, periodic research, as well as physical assessments.(Semester)

  • History & Social Science

AP® European History: 

This class is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course. In AP European History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing historical evidence; contextualization; comparison; causation; change and continuity over time; and argument development. The 
course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; individual and society; and national and European identity.  Pre-requisite:  score of 3 or higher on AP US History exam or grade of B or better in US History
 

  • History & Social Science

HIS 231 - Medieval Studies:  

In this introductory course, students will gain an overview of the socio-cultural and political history of (primarily) Western Europe from the so-called fall of the Roman Empire (~450 CE) through the Italian Humanist Renaissance and the beginning of the Ages of Exploration (~1500 CE). Students will be introduced to methods of historical inquiry, learning how to read primary and secondary sources, analyze them, synthesize data, and express that synthesis in oral and written form. Perhaps most importantly, you will find out why Mr. McCartney cringes every time someone uses the phrase "the dark ages."(Fall Semester)

  • History & Social Science

HIS 232 - Daily Life in Medieval England:

What was life in the past like? This course will allow students to explore the ins and outs of living in England between the years 650 and 1500 (primarily focusing on 13th and 14th century England).  We will explore essential tasks of everyday life like cooking and cleaning, as well as those endeavors specific to various professions, including weaving, healing, and writing. We may explore the exalted fields of forging, killing, and that most dangerous occupation, storytelling. If we’re really lucky, we may even get to venture a little way down the esoteric paths of alchemy and witchcraft! Using Frances & Joseph Gies’s Daily Life in Medieval Times, we’ll see how life differed depending on if you lived in a castle, a village, or a city. The course will be reading and writing intensive, as well as project-based, and the specific topics will be agreed upon between the instructor and student(s).   Both individual and group projects may be considered.  Students must be self-motivated and will be expected to do considerable independent work both in and out of the classroom. We’ll do significant reading from A Very Brief Introduction to Medieval England in the early part of the semester in order for students to familiarize themselves with the time period. Prerequisites: None.(Spring Semester)

  • History & Social Science

HIS 310U - U.S. History:  

Americans at the start of the 21st century find themselves confronting a series of compelling and important issues. Terrorism, the Iraq War, treatment of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, global warming, economic turbulence, the battle over the right-to-bear arms, calls for election reform, abortion, gay marriage, and the current debate over the status of illegal & legal immigrants have all been at the forefront of recent American thought. While many Americans may disagree about how we should address these issues, many Americans do not realize that many of the questions that these topics evoke are not new. Throughout our history, Americans have confronted numerous challenges, and in doing so, they established precedent for how we view modern issues.

This course provides students with an opportunity to more fully comprehend current dilemmas by focusing on the history of the United States. We examine the political, economic, and social changes and developments that have shaped the United States throughout its history. Using a variety of reading assignments, writing assignments, and research projects, we reach a better understanding of where we are as a nation today.  Prerequisite:  Junior standing or sophomore with permission of instructor.

  • History & Social Science

PSY 410U - AP Psychology: 

In accordance with American Psychological Association (APA) recommendation, this is a two-semester course. It exposes you to the science of psychology while developing a basic understanding of sensation, cognition, emotion, and behavior. You are invited to examine new ideas and hypotheses. Indeed, with a healthy dose of informed introspection, you may even begin to replace old habits, cognitive or behavioral, with new ones. There will be some hands-on activity, but the course is chiefly an exchange of information, some detective work, and a lot of analytical reading. An award-winning video series, Discovering Psychology, complements the text, and web-based resources provide opportunities for personal research. You should expect a blend of lectures, discussions, note-taking, oral reports, audio-visual presentations, unit quizzes,semester exams, and an APA-formatted capstone written project, a compilation of biweekly written research and reflection that relates to a common, pre-selected topic.

  • History & Social Science

SOC 300 - Anthropology I:

In Anthropology I we will begin with a unit on the various “schools” of the discipline and the course of human physical evolution. We’ll next turn our attention to the development of language, economic subsistence patterns, societal constructs of abnormality, comparative religion, and the basics of folklore.  Intentionally designed to be multi-disciplinary, this course is for students with interests from paleo-anatomy to Finnish folk music.(Fall Semester)

  • History & Social Science

SOC - Anthropology II:

(Spring Semester)

  • History & Social Science

SOC 310 - Sociology:

In Sociology we will look at the socializing processes by which we are shaped all through our lives. It commences with the theory of “Social Lenses”, or the culturally specific ways in which we view the world around us. We’ll look at some of the classic “schools” of Sociology over the years and analyze how they stack up in the modern world, we’ll look at particular examples of institutional socialization like the Amish “Rumspringe” ritual and the military boot camp experience, we’ll look at how the concept of deviance has evolved over the years, and we’ll end up with an examination of status and social ranking in the 21st century.  Prerequisite: none.  (Fall Semester)

  • History & Social Science

SOC 312 - American Government:

What began as a “radical” experiment in republican government almost two-and-a-half centuries ago has resulted in the world’s most stable, free, and democratic society at the beginning of the 21st century. America’s rise, however, did not happen overnight. While our core institutions remain the same as they were in 1789, American society has changed. A vast array of political, cultural, societal, and economic changes, to name only a few, is responsible for where we are as Americans today.
 
The purpose of this course will be to provide a broad overview of topics connected to US Government, including governmental purposes, functions, and structures. Our semester will begin with a look at the nature of government, the philosophical underpinnings of modern republican government, the role of US republican institutions, and we will explore concepts of minority rights within a majority rule system. We will also come to understand issues of public policy, political reform, and the role of the citizen. (Semester)

  • History & Social Science

SOC 340U - Economics I- Microeconomics: 

Microeconomics begins with a short segment on what precisely the study of economics entails. We then dive headlong into topics like demand, supply, how prices serve as signals, wage bands, price points, and a slew of topical economic current events. This course features numerous short exercises based upon the economic news of the day and it is intended to have as much “real world” content as is possible. Prerequisite: none. (Semester) (Fall Semester)

  • History & Social Science

SOC 341 Economics II - Macroeconomics:

(Spring Semester)

  • Mathematics

**MAT 001 - Introduction to Mathematical Competitions:

First year students to the MSSM who are interested in becoming actively involved with the MSSM Math Team who have NOT had previous experience or some experience with math teams may want to enroll in this class. Students will actively engage in the topics preparing the Maine Association of Math League and the New England Math League Competitions during the fall and spring semesters. All topics and materials will be discussed in class; seldom will there be any outside work unless you wish to become more proficient. All students in this class will compete in five Aroostook Math League events and six New England Math League events during the 2016 – 2017. Math Team Activities will be finished in March unless you qualify for other events. Grades are effort based.

  • Mathematics

**MAT 002 - Intermediate Mathematical Competitions:

Intermediate Mathematical Competitions will focus on preparing students for the Maine Association of Math Leagues, New Math League, American High School Mathematics Exam. The goal is develop strong competitors to be able to handle the rigor of the aforementioned competitions. This class will develop strategies for attacking and solving traditional and hard competition questions. All topics and materials will be discussed in class; seldom will there be any outside work unless you wish to become more proficient. All students in this class will compete in five Aroostook Math League events and six New England Math League events during the 2016 – 2017 season. Math Team Activities will be finished between mid-March unless you qualify for other events. Grades are effort based.

  • Mathematics

**MAT 003 - Accelerated Mathematical Competitions:

This class should be a fast moving and challenging mathematical competition experience. Students will explore all of the traditional Maine Association of Math Leagues Topics done through American High School, New England Math League, ARML, AMC and AIME past problems. Students will be prepared to compete at all levels of regional, statewide, New England and or National Competitions. All topics and materials will be discussed in class; seldom will there be any outside work unless you wish to become more proficient. All students in this class will compete in five Aroostook Math League events and six New England Math League events during the 2016 – 2017 season. This class will meet three days per week through Early May.

  • Mathematics

MAT 102 - Accelerated Principles of Geometry with Algebra:

This course is designed to help students that have a solid Algebra I background build a strong foundation in Algebra II while developing these skills in Euclidean Geometry.  The Algebra II concepts will focus heavily on polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, trigonometry and probability.  The Euclidean Geometry portion of the class will be a proofs based course building the fundamental understandings of  all aspects of Euclidean Geometry from basic lines and angles, lines in two and three dimensional space, parallel and perpendicular lines and their respective applications, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, similar polygons, Pythagorean Theorem with an introduction to plane trigonometry, area, surface area and volumes, coordinate geometries, geometric constructions, inequalities as well as enrichment topics.  Non-Euclidean ideas will be developed as well.   Placement is by the MSSM Algebra I Placement Test.  Students who complete this course with a 90 or better will move to the Acc. Advance Math BC course;  Students scoring between 75 and 89 will move to the Acc. Advanced Math course. 

  • Mathematics

MAT 202U - Accelerated Advanced Mathematics:

This course is an in depth study of elementary, intermediate and advanced algebraic structures which are essential for Before Calculus mathematics. Students will begin this course with introduction to the sets of numbers, review basic elementary structures and develop properties provable from the axioms. This is followed by the study of functions, relations, linear coordinate geometry, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions with real and complex numbers, exponents, logarithms, rational and irrational algebraic expressions. In the second semester, students study conic sections, higher-degree functions, theory of equations, develop complex numbers, sequences and series, Binomial Theorem, combinatorics and probability. This year long course will conclude with an in depth study of theoretical and numerical trigonometry concluding with a study of vectors. Students who complete this course with a 90 or better will move to the Acc. BC BC course; Students who average in the 83 to 89 range will move to the BC BC course and students who score between 75 and 83 will move to BC AB. Each of these courses will prepare students for either Acc. AP Calculus BC, AP Calculus BC or AP Calculus AB.

  • Mathematics

MAT 203U - Accelerated Advanced Mathematics BC:

This course has been designed for students who will complete the Accelerated Advanced Mathematics curriculum at a faster pace and explore topics much deeper than the Accelerated Advanced Mathematics content domain. Students will begin this course with introduction to the sets of numbers, review elementary algebraic structures and develop properties provable from the axioms. This is followed by the study of functions, relations, linear coordinate geometry, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions with real and complex numbers, exponents, common and natural logarithms, rational and irrational algebraic expressions, conic sections, higher-degree functions, theory of equations under complex numbers. In the second semester: students will develop greater understanding of Inequalities and Absolute Values in one or two variables, polynomial functions, graphs and inverses of functions. sequences and series, Binomial Theorem, combinatorics and probability. This year long course will conclude with an in depth study of theoretical and numerical trigonometry, vectors, determinants and matrices. Students must maintain a B average to remain in this course. Placement for the following year will be based on their final examination. Placement is by the MSSM Algebra II Placement Test or instructor permission.

  • Mathematics

MAT 204U - Accelerated Principles of Geometry: 

This is a geometric elective course designed for a student who has not taken a traditional course in geometry;it will cover the content of MAT102 - Principles of Geometry in one semester.  Students will be eligible to elect this course after the completion of Accelerated Advanced Mathematics.  (Fall Semester

  • Mathematics

MAT 301U - Before Calculus AB:

Before Calculus AB covers the traditional pre-calculus curriculum, as well as, a variety of other topics accessible to students prior to a study of the Calculus. First semester topics include linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions, inequalities and absolute values, exponential and logarithmic functions, and conic sections. Second semester covers trigonometric functions and their applications, complex numbers, polar functions, combinatorics, probability and mathematical modeling. The course concludes with a brief introduction to limits. Students who successfully complete this course are fully prepared for a study of AP Calculus AB. Prerequisite: Advanced Mathematics or instructor permission.

  • Mathematics

MAT 302U - Before Calculus BC:

Before Calculus BC covers topics similar to Before Calculus AB. Other topics, including vectors, matrices, determinants, sequences, and series are also covered. While the topics are similar to that of Before Calculus AB, the material is covered in great depth, and at a fast pace. The instructor also has a high expectation of student independence. Students who successfully complete this course are fully prepared for a study of AP Calculus BC. Prerequisite: Advanced Mathematics or instructor permission.

  • Mathematics

MAT 303U - Accelerated Before Calculus BC:

Accelerated Before Calculus BC covers topics similar to Before Calculus BC, however, students are introduced to a study of the Calculus in the latter part of the spring term. These topics include limits, continuity, and derivatives. While topics are similar to those of Before Calculus BC, the material is covered in greater depth and at a faster pace. Also, the instructor has an extremely high expectation of student independence. Students who successfully complete this course are fully prepared to enroll in Accelerated AP Calculus BC. Prerequisite: Instructor permission

  • Mathematics

MAT 401U - AP Calculus AB:

Topics in this course include limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, integrals, integration techniques, numerical methods, applications of integrals, introductory differential equations, and slope fields. In addition to the specific AP Calculus AB curriculum, students are introduced to an array of other Calculus topics. Prerequisite: Before Calculus AB or instructor permission.

  • Mathematics

MAT 402U - AP Calculus BC:

This course covers the entire AP Calculus BC curriculum, as well as, additional calculus topics. The content includes infinite series, calculus with parametric, vector, and polar functions, as well as, each of the AP Calculus AB topics. In addition to studying a broad curriculum, AP Calculus BC students are expected to master a variety of theory elements in order to gain a great depth of understanding. Prerequisite: Before Calculus BC or instructor permission

  • Mathematics

MAT 403U - Accelerated AP Calculus BC:

In this one-semester course, students complete an in depth study of the AP Calculus BC curriculum. The approach is rigorous and students are expected to master the full scope of theory elements, as well as, computational skills. Prerequisite: Accelerated Before Calculus BC or instructor permission. (Fall Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT 404U - Multivariable Calculus:

In this course, students study the Calculus of vector-valued functions followed by functions of several variables, multiple integrals, and integration in vector fields. Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC or instructor permission (Spring Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT 410U - AP Statistics:

This course will focus on concepts of data collection and analysis, including all of the topics covered on the Advanced Placement Exam for Statistics. During the first semester students will study exploratory data analysis for univariate and bivariate data, data collection methods and experimental design, an extensive introduction to probability, and linear and nonlinear regression. During the second semester, students will study statistical inference, including hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for single means and proportions as well as comparisons of two means and proportions, chi-square tests, and inference on regression. Throughout the course, students will collect and analyze their own data, read and critique statistics-based articles in the media and scientific literature, and write critically. Co-requisite: Before Calculus AB.

  • Mathematics

MAT 501 - Introduction to Higher Mathematics:  

This is a one semester course intended to provide our more advanced mathematics students valuable experience in working independently and in communicating mathematics by constructing rigorous proofs using accepted mathematical language. Several weeks at the beginning of the semester will be devoted to surveying the types of problems that may be tackled in a reasonable fashion by burgeoning mathematics students while their skills are growing in sophistication. However, class time will be mainly dedicated to focused and independent study supervised and facilitated by me. Topics/tools that will be under consideration by the individual students will include but not be limited to, formal logic, set theory, group theory, ring theory, applications of linear algebra, all levels of analytic and statistical methods, engineering mathematics including ordinary and partial differential equations, topological arguments, combinatorics, number theoretic methods, and computer programming. Assessment will be based entirely on the individual student’s methodical progress towards solving some small problems by giving regular oral and written reports indicating thought processes in attacking and proving mathematical claims.  Prerequisite:  Students should have completed Multivariable Calculus and have consent of the Mathematics Department. Exceptions to the MVCalc rule might be made for particularly mature thinkers who are at least taking Calculus concurrently. (Fall Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT 502U - Linear Algebra:

This one-semester course is designed to give upper-level students a deep understanding of the topics of linear algebra, including matrices, linear independence, determinants, eigenvalues, general vector spaces, inner product spaces, and linear transformations. Rigor and proofs form the basis of all that is studied. Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC or instructor permission. (Fall Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT 504U - Complex Analysis:

This one-semester course covers the fundamental concepts of an introductory undergraduate-level course of the theory of differentiation and integration of complex functions. Particular emphasis is placed on advanced logical reasoning, integrated problem-solving and proof-writing. Prerequisite: Multivariable Calculus (Spring Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT 506 - Number Theory:

This one semester course covers the material of a typical first undergraduate number theory course. Topics will include: Basis representation, The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, combinatorial and computational number theory, the Euclidean Algorithm, fundamentals of congruences, solving congruences, elementary arithmetic and multiplicative functions, especially the Euler Phi function, primitive roots, sums of squares, elementary partition theory, generating function methods for sequences, approximations of pi and other transcendental constants. Most of these topics are typically referred to as Analytic Number Theory. We could possibly endeavor to cover some introductory Algebraic Number theory, examining number rings and their ramified and unramified prime Ideals.(Spring Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT 510U - Accelerated AP Statistics:

This course will focus on concepts of data collection and analysis, including all of the topics covered on the Advanced Placement Exam for Statistics. The course will cover all topics included in MSSM's AP Statistics course (see above), but will do so at a faster pace, with greater depth, and with attention to how concepts in calculus and statistics are interconnected. The second semester of Accelerated AP Statistics will cover additional topics such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), F-Tests, advanced regression models, non-parametric statistics, and others at instructor's discretion. Throughout the course, students will collect and analyze their own data, read and critique statistics-based articles in the media and scientific literature, and write critically. Prerequisite: Completion of AP Calculus, or instructor permission.

  • Mathematics

MAT 512U - Differential Equations:

This course about ordinary differential equations (ODE’s) covers standard solution methods for first-order ODE’s, including graphical and numerical methods, higher order forced linear equations with constant coefficients, complex numbers, Laplace Transforms, systems of ODE’s with constant coefficients, non-linear systems, series solutions to second-order ODE’s, and mathematical modeling. Fourier Series and a cursory study of partial differential equations complete the curriculum. Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC or instructor permission. (Fall Semester)

  • Mathematics

MAT - Topics in Mathematics:

(Spring Semester)

  • Science

SCI 111 - Physical Science:

An introduction to basic concepts in physics, chemistry, and earth science. This course covers the foundations of physical science. During the first half of the school year, we will focus primarily on Earth science and planetary science as we examine the way forces, energy fluxes, temperature gradients, and phase changes give rise to dynamic systems on Earth and other bodies of the Solar System. Later on in the spring term, we will delve into the realm of atoms, electricity, magnetism, and light as we further explore physics and chemistry. Not available to returning students - registration by placement only.

  • Science

SCI 220 - Chemistry:

This survey course covers measurement, electron arrangement, periodicity, chemical bonding, reaction rate, acids and bases, and organic chemistry. The approach is lab-centered and utilizes a historical perspective to emphasize the role of chemistry in society. Chemistry is appropriate for students intending to pursue careers in the health field or non-science areas. Prerequisite: placement based upon math class.

  • Science

SCI 211 - Astronomy I:

Students become energetically engaged with the skills and tools utilized by the modern professional astronomer in probing and describing the dynamic processes shaping our Universe. First semester studies introduce students to our geocentric astronomical heritage and the modern conceptual and mathematical models revolutionizing our interpretation of cosmic phenomena, especially pertaining to the solar system. Coursework includes readings, outdoor/indoor lab activities, field work at local planetarium, community service observation project, tests, quizzes, homework assignments, final projects, life-skill interviews, topic reports, and chapter summaries from textbook. (Fall Semester)

This course does not meet the physics graduation requirement, or the lab science requirement. 

  • Science

SCI 212 - Astronomy II:

Students become energetically engaged with the skills and tools utilized by the modern professional astronomer in probing and describing the dynamic processes shaping our Universe. In the spring semester, students study the elements of stellar and galactic astronomy ultimately arriving to the front line cosmological issues of our age. Exobiological exploration and anthropoic concerns examined to bring compelling closure to perhaps humanity's oldest scientific quest. Course-work includes readings, outdoor/indoor lab activities, field work at local planetarium, community service observation project, tests, quizzes, homework assignments, final projects, life skill interviews, topic reports, and chapter summaries from textbook.(Spring Semester)

This class does not count as a lab science.

  • Science

SCI 320U - Honors Chemistry:

Honors Chemistry is similar in course content to AP Chemistry and should be considered a prerequisite for AP Chemistry. The course is less rigorous and moves at a slower pace. The laboratory sequence focuses on developing lab skills and reinforcing concepts while the AP lab equivalent assumes a level of laboratory skill and focuses on enhancing technique and precision. Prerequisite: A ‘B-’ or better in MSSM Chemistry or permission of instructor.

  • Science

SCI 330U - Biological Processes and Research:

This college-level course introduces students to the field of Biology. The first semester covers the cellular and biochemical mechanisms behind the major biological processes: photosynthesis, respiration, transport, growth, reproduction, inheritance, etc. Areas of focus include acquiring energy, using energy to produce new tissue, and evolution. The second semester will focus on conducting research in four major areas of organismal biology: microbes, plants, animals, ecosystems. Both semesters will be lab-based with the second semester, especially, providing experience in experimental design, hypothesis testing, data analysis, and presentation skills. Students who wish to take the AP Biology exam should enroll in this course. Prerequisite: A grade of B- or higher in Honors Chemistry, or permission of instructor.

  • Science

SCI 331U - Anatomy and Physiology:

This college-level course introduces students to the structure and function of the human body. The first semester establishes the cellular and biochemical basis for life and focuses on the integument, skeletal, muscle, nervous and endocrine systems. The second semester emphasizes the functions of the sense organs, immunity, reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems. Numerous integrated hands-on lab experiences and case study analyses will occur throughout this course. Prerequisite:  previous chemistry course.

  • Science

SCI 333U - Plant Biology:

This one-semester college-level class will introduce basic biological concepts such as metabolism, cells and cell processes, growth and development, genetics, and evolution by studying plants. The MSSM Greenhouse will be heavily utilized for projects and practical applications of plant biology knowledge. Prerequisite: Previous chemistry course. (Spring Semester)

  • Science

SCI 334 - Hibernation Biology/Winter Ecology:

All organisms that live in an area with distinct seasons must have some way to cope with the cold times. Migratory organisms simply avoid the cold by leaving, but many others stay. Those that remain have numerous adaptations that allow them to successfully survive low temperature stress. In this class we will examine a number of biochemical and behavioral strategies used by organisms – both plants and animals – to thrive in cold climates. Readings will be drawn from journal articles, Bernd Heinrich’s Winter World, and Peter Marchand’s Life in the Cold. The lab and student research portion of the class will center around a project the instructor worked on while on sabbatical at the Jackson Laboratory, involving seasonal changes in kidney function in hibernating black bears. Prerequisite: 1 semester of biology or permission of instructor. (Spring Semester)

  • Science

SCI 340 - Physics:

This is a year long class in which a mathematically sophisticated development is used to aid in understanding the physical world. The first semester of this course covers the topics of mechanics, waves and sounds, fluids, and thermodynamics. The second semester concentrates on electricity, magnetism, optics, and topics in modern physics. Weekly labs enhance the understanding of concepts presented in class while also presenting a perspective of how science is performed by introducing and using error analysis. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Before Calculus AB or permission of instructor.

  • Engineering

SCI 411 - Engineering – Applied Mechanics/Statics:

A study of force systems and equilibrium, structural models, friction and distributed forces designed to develop the ability to analyze and solve engineering problems. Students will be introduced to mathematical software used in engineering. Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB

  • Science

SCI 420U - AP Chemistry:

AP Chemistry is a year long, college-level chemistry course designed to meet the requirements of the advanced placement curriculum as defined by the College Board. The course seeks to meet these curriculum requirements within a laboratory framework. Emphasis is placed on laboratory safety, developing experimental techniques, applications to critical societal problems such as global warming and hazardous waste generation, and the economic importance of chemistry. This course is recommended for students intending to pursue careers in chemistry, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, toxicology, biology, chemical engineering, and other related fields. Prerequisite: A ‘B-’ or better in MSSM Honors Chemistry or permission of instructor.

  • Science

SCI 421 - Organic Chemistry:

Organic Chemistry has been designed to build on students’ understanding of the fundamental principles developed in Honors Chemistry. This course will provide a study of bonding theories, organic chemistry reaction mechanisms, and common organic laboratory practices. A general list of topics includes nomenclature, structures, chemical properties, as well as reactions and mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers. Further topics will include isomerization, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. This course will have a strong laboratory component which will focus on a variety of laboratory techniques including chromatography, spectroscopy, distillation, as well as separation, purification and characterization of organic compounds. Prerequisite: B or higher in Honors chemistry, B or higher in ACC (Fall Semester)

  • Science

SCI 422 - Biochemistry:

This course will provide a study of reactions that occur in biological systems. Topics to be covered include: chemical principles of biological systems; chemical and physical properties of nucleotides, amino acids, proteins and water; protein structure and stability; introduction to steady-state kinetics; enzyme mechanism; controlling enzyme activity; metabolic circuitry; glucose transport and metabolism; pyruvate metabolism; the TCA cycle; electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation; glycogen metabolism; gluconeogenesis and the pentose shunt; fatty acid catabolism and synthesis; disposal of nitrogen: the urea cycle; amino acid catabolism and synthesis. This course will have a strong laboratory component which will focus on a variety of biochemistry and microbiology laboratory techniques including enzyme assays, kinetics studies, protein/DNA isolation and purification, and gel electrophoresis. Prerequisite: B or higher in Honors Chemistry, and previous course in the biological sciences.

(Fall Semester)

  • Science

SCI 432U - Genetics & Biotechnology: 

Advances in genetics and biotechnology have a huge impact on daily life, with applications in fields such as medicine, forensics, agriculture, conservation, natural history, and many others.  In this course we will learn about DNA and RNA, gene structure and function, protein synthesis, and cell biology.  We will also use tools such as PCR, electrophoresis, restriction analysis, gene sequencing,  and bioinformatics databases in several projects on personalized medicine and the human microbiome.  We will also discuss various biotechnology applications, ethical issues and controversies surrounding its use.  Prerequisite:  previous chemistry course  (Fall Semester)

  • Science

SCI 440U - AP Physics C:

This year long, college-level course concentrates on topics in mechanics with some thermodynamics. Calculus is the mathematical basis for the class and is used extensively. As this is a physics class, there is a great emphasis placed on concepts and conceptual understanding. Weekly labs are performed to enhance the understanding of the physical concepts presented in class while also providing perspective on how science is performed by introducing, and using, error analysis. Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or higher, or concurrently enrolled in Accelerated AP Calculus BC.

  • Science

SCI 530 - Computational Biology:

This course provides an authentic research experience, presenting opportunities for students to work collaboratively with scientists at the Jackson Laboratories. Skills and tools acquired include both those specific to the field of complex trait analysis and others fundamental to any research project. Topics include a review of genetics and related web resources along with an introduction to the application of statistics in QTL and microarray analysis. General skills are honed in asking meaningful and answerable questions, planning experiments, managing time, keeping records and communicating orally and in writing. The format includes lecture, recitation, and journal club. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a Biology course; co-requisite: Calculus BC or higher, or permission of instructor.

  • Science

SCI 542 - Field and Spacetime:  

This course is a third-semester lecture course in physics, which follows a year-long calculus-based lecture series. In this course we will explore electromagnetic phenomena, fundamentals of classical field theory, and how these topics necessitate relativity. Topics covered include electric charge, electric and magnetic fields, electrostatic potentials, Ampere's law, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations in integral form, electromagnetic waves, the postulates of the special theory of relativity, relativistic kinematics and dynamics, and the connections between special relativity and electromagnetism. Prerequisite:  AP Physics C

  • World Languages

CHI 210U - UMPI Chinese I:

This is an introduction to modern standard Chinese (Mandarin) with emphasis on developing conversational skills by using fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional and culturally suitable contexts. Basic reading and writing are taught. The Chinese culture, history, and arts are also introduced in this course. (Fall Semester)

  • World Languages

CHI 211U - UMPI Chinese II:

This class is a continuation of UMPI Chinese I. (Spring Semester)

  • World Languages

CHI 310 - Intermediate Chinese:

This continuation of introductory Chinese focuses on communication in Chinese for everyday purposes. The emphasis of this course is on language practice. The rules of grammar and pronunciation are also carefully taught. The Chinese culture, history, art, and local customs are introduced in this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of UMPI Chinese I and II.

  • World Languages

CHI 410 - Advanced Chinese (Chinese III):

This course continues instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.  Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Intermediate Chinese.(Fall Semester)

  • World Languages

CHI 510 - Chinese IV:

Chinese IV is a Chinese course devoted primarily to reading and discussing literature and culturally related topics in Chinese. This course will teach modern standard Chinese (Mandarin) with simplified Chinese characters. The main purposes of this course are to enlarge students’ vocabulary, to increase students’ reading speed, to improve students’ reading comprehension, to maintain students’ conversation skills through class presentation and class discussion, and to enhance students’ writing ability through composition assignments, and a writing project. Prerequisite: Advanced Chinese (Chinese III) at MSSM or equivalent.

  • World Languages

FRE 111 - French I (Novice Level) Introduction to Francophone Studies:

This course will help students discover how to successfully acquire a new language and to understand the relationship that exists between one's mother tongue and French. Students explore language learning through cultural frameworks and from an international perspective on the world. They gain an appreciation for their role in the francosphere and the world beyond.

The focus is on conversational French, basic grammatical concepts and major themes of first year language and vocabulary development. Students demonstrate proficiency in oral, written, aural, cultural and linguistic competencies through a rigorous curriculum looking at France and the French speaking world. As each quarter progresses we will increase French and decrease the use of English.

Students will negotiate for meaning and learn to communicate in the present, past and immediate future tenses. Technology is integrated into all French classes using a SmartBoard, laptops and tablets allowing us to travel the world from the comfort and safety of our beautiful campus. Students create presentations, visuals, videos, audio recordings, podcasts and more. Because we are located in a French speaking area on the international border, French language learning is exciting and holds many opportunities for real world application. Students strive to become French speakers and understand the value bilingualism holds for them.

  • World Languages

FRE 211 - French II (Intermediate Level) Enriched Francophone Studies:

This course allows many opportunities for students to perfect their spoken and written language. They further develop the concepts and notions of their first year French experience. Continually spiraling upward building upon prior knowledge, students explore the francophone world in greater depth. Students work on their accent and improve their writing skills through composition and literacy activities using authentic materials.

Lessons are taught within the following core areas: Cultural Diversity, Customs and Traditions, Health and Leisure, Science and Technology, Communication and Media and Global Issues. This second year course in French will expose students to living language and culture and will delve into greater details of grammar and the workings of language. There is a continued focus on conversational French as students learn to master tenses and build vocabulary through extended and maintained immersion sessions using TPR(S) and other best practices according to current language acquisition theories. Students are encouraged to explore and practice often outside of the classroom setting by practicing at lunch, in the dormitories and in the community. Prerequisite: successful completion of one year of French study

  • World Languages

FRE 311 - French III (Pre-Immersion):

In our third year we study French from a much more advanced and intensive standpoint. This is a pre-immersion class, meaning the vast majority of the class is taught in French. We use English for clarification and for enrichment purposes only. We gain the skills necessary to be successful in the fourth year French class which is entirely in French and focuses on literature, film, culture and history. This course will expose students to a wide variety of topics in science, mathematics, the social sciences and the humanities. We do this through intensive three week immersion workshops allowing students to delve into the interdisciplinary content areas. Prerequisite: French II or equivalent.

  • World Languages

FRE 411 - Études Francophones Avancées ( Immersion totale ):

Advanced Francophone Studies (Total Immersion) - This fourth year total immersion class sets students at the center of their own learning through intensive hands-on thematic workshops.  It is expected that all students speak French the entire time.  Students sign a language agreement, and will work in French study/practice groups outside of class. In addition to advanced grammar and workings of language, students explore the francophone world through the exploration of French literature and poetry to include various periods and genres.  We also explore French history, French cinematography and theater, as well as medieval and renaissance studies, to name a few. This intensive course requires true dedication to language acquisition and really allows students to have a fun time in the target language. Prerequisites:  a minimum of three years of high school French (or an interview with the instructor to determine proficiency) (Fall Semester)

  • World Languages

FRE 511 - Études-francophones guidées/ Independant Guided Study (Superiour Level - Cours indépendant):  

In our fifth year we study French through independent guided work. This is a rigourous total immersion class, meaning the vast majority of the class is taught in French (nearly 100 % of the time). We use English for clarification and for enrichment purposes only. We gain the skills necessary to be successful in the real world and to be successful at the university level and beyond. We delve into Francophone literature and poetry, film, culture and history, to name a few. This class builds on the fourth year class and allows a level of autonomy for the highest achieving and driven students. Students read novels, analyze, write and publish poetry, and work on various projects and research opportunities on their own time. The workload is heavy, so students must be prepared to dedicate a minimum of six hours per week to their work. In addition, one office hour per week is mandatory at which time we conduct ourselves entirely in French. The course will consist of six in-depth units over the course of the year, three per semester.


In addition to your independent semester work, students will have a community-wide capstone presentation due each semester as part of your grade. This presentation is a public defense of your work, in French, each semester in front of an audience in 101 at lunchtime (made up of myself and students of third, fourth and fifth year students – but open to the MSSM community) This is the final exam grade. Prerequisite: FRE 411 or equivalent/instructor approval. Independent Studies require a minimum of three years in the content. 

  • World Languages

SPA 111U - Español I: La Introducción [Spanish I: Beginning Spanish]:

This is an introductory level course to Spanish language and the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Students will develop skills in speaking and listening comprehension. They will be able to understand and speak about themselves, their families, school interests and daily life. They will be able to ask and answer questions in Spanish. Students must be able to memorize substantial information when required, such as grammar and vocabulary, as they are necessary in developing background context. Students will learn to draw information from authentic resources such as fictional and nonfictional texts, news and films to participate in interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational communication.
 

*Prerequisite:

  • humble openness to sharing and making mistakes
  • willingness to speak the language in front of peers and teacher
  • dedication to practice speaking out loud and listening every day outside of class
  • ability to advocate for oneself and ask for assistance when needed
  • World Languages

SPA 211U - Español II: Nivel Intermedio [Spanish II: Intermediate Spanish]:  

This is a second level Spanish language course for students who have successfully completed Spanish I at MSSM or a one-year Spanish course at another school (or by placement interview). Students will briefly review Spanish I content during the first month but will be expected to know the basics and/or catch up with peers and teacher outside of class. This course seeks to build on listening and speaking skills, along with developing reading and writing proficiency. By the end of this course, students will perform the following activities within the context of the topics studied:

  • describe events in the past, present and future
  • ask and answer questions in Spanish
  • talk and write about everyday situations
  • participate in rehearsed and unrehearsed role-plays based on familiar situations

*Prerequisite:

  • humble openness to sharing and making mistakes
  • willingness to speak the language in front of peers and teacher
  • determination in memorizing substantial information when required
  • dedication to practice speaking out loud and listening every day outside of class
  • ability to advocate for oneself and ask for assistance when needed
  • World Languages

SPA 311 - Español III: Los efectos de hispanohablantes en los Estados Unidos [Spanish III: The influence of Spanish speakers in the United States]:  

This is an advanced Spanish course that explores past and current influences of Spanish speakers in the United States. Students will work on their ability to read, write, comprehend and speak Spanish through a variety of themes. These themes will include: Families and Communities, Housing, Immigrant Policies, Chicano Revolution, Personal and Public Identities and Global Challenges. Students will build practical communicative skills, situational vocabulary and cultural knowledge. They will work on a variety of authentic audio and written texts to participate in interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational communication. Classes will be taught in Spanish.

*Prerequisite:

  • minimum of 2 years of Spanish language courses (or by placement interview)
  • humble openness to sharing and making mistakes
  • willingness to speak the language in front of peers and teacher
  • determination in memorizing substantial information when required
  • dedication to practice speaking out loud and listening every day outside of class
  • interest or passion in further exploring the Spanish language and culture
  • ability to advocate for oneself and ask for assistance when needed
  • World Languages

SPA 411 - Español IV: Poesía, Literatura y Arte de Países Hispanohablantes  [Spanish IV: Poetry, Literature & Art]:  

This is an advanced Spanish course where students are introduced to reading and composition in poetry, literature and art. While students will continue to increase their working vocabulary through thematic topics, they will also learn strategies to approach written texts. Additionally, students will express themselves more formally in writing and orally. Previous grammar topics may be studied in more depth and advanced structures will be introduced. Students will learn to draw information from authentic resources such as fictional and nonfictional texts, news and films to participate in interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational communication. Classes will be taught in Spanish.

*Prerequisite:

  • Required texts:  
  • “Como agua para chocolate” Laura Esquivel
  • “Deseo de ser punk” Belen Gopegui
  • minimum of 2 years of Spanish language courses (or by placement interview)
  • humble openness to sharing and making mistakes
  • willingness to speak the language in front of peers and teacher
  • determination in memorizing substantial information when required
  • dedication to practice speaking out loud and listening every day outside of class
  • interest or passion in further exploring the Spanish language and culture
  • ability to advocate for oneself and ask for assistance when needed
  • Seminars

**SEM 101U - First Year Seminar:

This class supports first-year students in their transition into the MSSM community by providing them with an in depth understanding of the academic and residential programs and requirements of MSSM. This introduction to a variety of proven academic and residential resources, skills, and strategies is designed to help students succeed during their first semester at MSSM, laying the groundwork for continued years of success at MSSM and beyond. (Fall Semester)

  • Seminars

**SEM 301 - Junior Seminar:

This class focuses on preparing for the college application process, and is required of all Juniors. (Spring Semester)

**SEM 401 - Senior Seminar:

This class focuses on the college application process, and is required of all Seniors. (Fall Semester)